Green-fingered Anglesey students venture into a new world of farming

Ysgol Uwchradd Caergybi in the Welsh Holyhead, Anglesey, has become the first school to explore the area of hydroponics or vertical farming. In collaboration with Menter Môn’s agri-tech program, Tech Tyfu, the installation of the growing system has provided pupils with new learning experiences.

The unit was supplied to the school by Tech Tyfu with funds from the AONB Sustainable Development Fund, through the Isle of Anglesey Council.

The students developed a mixed salad bag product at the end of the sessions with pea shoots and microgreens, which were presented to staff and parents. The scheme allows young people to develop important workplace skills - from entrepreneurship to problem solving and teamwork.

Nia Wyn Roberts is Assistant Headteacher at Ysgol Uwchradd Caergybi: “As a school, we’re really lucky to have received this vertical farm unit through the Tech Tyfu scheme. The idea of having a ‘farm’ in an urban school was really interesting. We look forward to making full use of the unit across all learning ages, and there will be opportunities for pupils to use the products in their catering lessons and learn more about the scientific aspects of the unit.”

Dr Luke Tyler, Agri-Tech Manager at Menter Môn added: “It’s been a fantastic experience working with the school delivering these sessions and seeing the response of the students to this technology. The students engaged with the project more than we could have expected, proposing their own crops and developing their own product at the end of the sessions. We even had one boy overcome a lifetime dislike of spring onions and enjoy tasting a crop of microleeks." 

Read the complete article at www.inyourarea.co.uk.


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